Dr. Christine Moissl- Eichinger

Universität Regensburg
Lehrstuhl für Mikrobiologie

News



New adress since september 2014:

Prof. Dr. Christine Moissl-Eichinger

Medizinische Universität Graz
Klinik für Innere Medizin
Auenbrugger Platz 15

A-8036 Graz
Austria

http://www.medunigraz.at/projekte/interactive-microbiome-research/

christine.moissl-eichinger@medunigraz.at

Tel.: +43 316 385 72808



Topics

Uncultivated Archaea: The SM1 Euryarchaeon SM1 Euryarchaeon
Astrobiology: ARBEX ARBEX
 

Planetary Protection

Planetary Protection

The SM1 Euryarchaeon: The only known Archaeon that predominates a natural biotope

In association with filamentous Bacteria the not-yet-culturable SM1 Euryarchaeon forms specific, macroscopically visible microbial consortia. This so called “string-of-pearls community” could be found in different sulfidic springs nearby Regensburg (Rudolph et al., 2001; Moissl et al., 2002). In each pearl, the cold-loving, unique Archaea are forming a microcolony in the interior, while the filamentous Bacteria cover the outside and form the strings. Supposedly, the Bacteria and Archaea are living in a symbiosis based on a sulfur cycle as their energy source (Moissl et al., 2002).

Although the cultivation of the SM1 Euryarchaeon has not been successful so far, an in situ trapping system in the natural biotope allows the access to high amounts of biomass of the Archaeon. Using this system, the string-of-pearls community could be further investigated using microbiological and molecular techniques (Moissl et al., 2003).
Besides the string-of-pearls community, another amazing lifestyle of the SM1 Euryarchaeon has been discovered in the subsurface of sulfidic springs. There it can grow without bacterial partner and forms therefore the only so far discovered archaeal biofilm with high purity (Henneberger et al., 2006).
In the biofilm, and at the interior of the pearls, the SM1-euryarchaeal cocci have a conspicuous regular distance to each other (approximately 4 µm). Single cell imaging showed that the surface of a single coccus has up to 3-µm-long cell surface appendices, which first seemed to be similar to pili (Moissl et al., 2005).
However, these have a so far undiscovered complexity among the Prokaryotes. The central and longest part of the cell appendage is the so called ‘prickle region’: With a distance of approximately 46 nm to one another, units of three pickles emerge from the filament. The terminal part is the so called hook region. There, the filament, which consists of three protein strands, is split into three distinct hooks forming a nano-grappling hook. Due to its complex architecture and its differentness to others a new class of cell surface appendages was introduced: “Hamus” (plural: “Hami”, latin for hook, barb, fishing-rod; Moissl et al., 2005).
The entire, complex structure is formed by units of a single 120-kDa large protein. Unfortunately, the assembly of the hamus itself is still unclear. Based on the protein sequence the gene of the subunit could be identified, which, however, shows no homology to publicly available sequences.
In general, the hamus with its nano-grappling hook represents the smallest hook currently available and has a very high efficiency regarding adherence to surfaces. Moreover, it has proven stable in a broad range of  both, temperature and pH. An application to nanobiotechnology of this fascinating structure is investigated.

Importance of the system
The SM1 Euryarchaeon is phylogenetically distinct (more than 20% difference in the 16S rRNA gene compared to other cultivated Archaea) and forms a separate branch within the ME-group (miscellaneous euryarchaeota group, MEG). Due to the constant occurence in (sulfidic) springs in Europe and its appearance in hot spots a large ecological role of this group of organisms can be assumed.
Two stable biotopes of the SM1 Euryarchaeon are located in close vicinity to Regensburg and accessible for scientific research at the Archaea center: The main spring of the Sippenauer Moor and the Muehlbacher Schwefelquelle. In both springs, the SM1 Euryarchaeon forms a partner-independent biofilm in the subsurface. On the surface (directly after the spring emanation) it forms the specific „string-of-pearls communities“. Both life styles (consortium and „pure“ biofilm) can be directly compared in both biotopes.
Despite the current unculturability of the SM1 Euryarchaeon, it is possible to analyze the in situ Situation and obtain real environmental data, without influencing the system under laboratory conditions. The established method to enrich, or better harvest the SM1 Euryarchaeon from its natural biotope, allows a stable and reliable delivery of biomass for our research activities.
Very unusual for known Archaea and their biotopes, the SM1 Euryarchaeon predominates its biotope in the subsurface and could possible even suppress other Bacteria or Archaea in its close vicinity. In general, all studies of the model organism SM1 Euryarchaeon have provided insights into the properties of (cold-loving), naturally occurring Archaea, which have not been obtained in other systems or by laboratory pure cultures. 

Current research :

The most important questions:
•Which metabolic capabilities does SM1 have?
•Which information can be obtained from the genome of the SM1 Euryarchaeon?
•What are the differences of the systems biofilm and string-of-pearl community in both
  biotopes?
•Which Bacteria are stable partners of the SM1 Euryarchaeon and how do they interact?
•What is the basis of the string-of-pearls community and why does the SM1
  Euryarchaeon accept Thiothrix/Sulfuricurvum as a partner in the surface waters and how
  do they interact?
•What is the trigger for the change from one life style to the other?
•Are the aquatic systems Sippenauer Moor and Islinger Muehlbach connected?
•Why and how does the SM1 Euryarchaeon suppress the Bacteria in the biofilm? Which
  Bacteria are not suppressed and why?
•How do the SM1 cells interact with each other, with bacterial partners and the abiotic
  environment?
•Do the hami play a role in signal transfer?
•Can the hami be useful for nanobiotechnology?

Using state-of-the-art technologies in the field of molecular ecology, both lifestyles of the SM1 Euryarchaeon are being characterized in depth. The microbial diversity of the string-of-pearl community and of the biofilm are investigated using the recently developed PhyloChip (TM) DNA Microarray G3 technology (Hazen et al., 2010).
On the other hand, the bio(geo)chemistry of the communities are being analyzed as this lifestyle has never been observed before for Archaea. Therefore, we use Synchrotron Radiation based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectromicroscopy.
Finally, metagenome analysis (454 pyrosequencing and illumina HISeq 2000 (paired-end) of purified biofilms is performed to decipher the secret about function and metabolic capabilities of the SM1 Euryarchaeon.
These analyses are a basis for the attempt to finally grow the SM1 Euryarchaeon as a pure culture in the laboratory.

Current cooperations:

Dr. Gary Andersen
(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA)
Dr. Hoi-Ying Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA)
Prof. Dr. Thomas Rattei (University of Vienna, Austria)
Prof. Dr. Christa Schleper (University of Vienna, Austria
)

This project is funded by the DFG (MO1977 3-1).

SM1-Pearl
SM1-Zellen within the "pearl".

SM1 - archaeal biofilm

archaeal biofilm attached to the in situ trapping system
Archaeal biofilm attached to the
"in situ trapping system"

SM1-Euryarchaeon with Hami
SM1-Euryarchaeon with multiple Hami (unique cell surface appendages). Circles show the terminal hook region at the terminal side of some filaments.
(Fig.: G. Wanner)

cryo-electron tomography of a hamus
Cryo-electron tomography of a hamus
(Fig.: Ariane Briegel)

 



Project „ARBEX“: Archaea and extremophilic Bacteria onboard the International Space Station ISS

Compared to clean room environments on earth, the inner of the ISS is an even more ‘extreme’ habitat for microorganisms. While the diversity of microorganisms in clean rooms shows a dependence on the microbial flora of the geographical location (Moissl et al., 2007), the ISS itself has no surrounding microbial environment. Instead, this isolated system, has been continuously inhabited by humans since November 2000. Consequently, it represents a unique ecosystem with an uninterrupted presence of humans and prokaryotes in space – for more than 10 years now.

So far, mostly human associated Bacteria were detected onboard the ISS, which can even show an increased pathogenicity due to low gravity. Hence, it is plausible that microgravity and increased irradiation doses could have a selective pressure on the microbial community. Interestingly, the microbial diversity onboard the ISS has previously been investigated by basic cultivation attempts or molecular approaches tailored to detection of Bacteria. As Archaea have consequently not been targeted in these surveys, it remains unclear if they are present and what role they may play onboard the ISS.

Archaea have already been detected in ESA and NASA clean rooms (Moissl et al., 2008; Moissl-Eichinger, 2011); hence, it is plausible that this group of microorganisms has also colonized the ISS.

Open questions are:
• Are Archaea present onboard the ISS?
• What kind of Archaea can be found? Thaumarchaeota?
• How many Archaea are there compared to Bacteria?
• What is their physiological status?
• Are they cultivable in the laboratory?
• What kind of functional genes of Archaea can be found? What roles do Archaea play
   there?
• Is the microbial community stable during the stay of the astronauts?
• Is the archaeal community similar to the clean room community found on Earth?

Besides Archaea, we are also interested in the bacterial community on board the ISS. Are there Bacteria with certain resistances and have they adapted to this extraordinary environment?

The flight program “ARBEX“ (Archaeal and bacterial extremophiles on board the ISS) has been approved by European Research Council (ERC) and was evaluated as “excellent“. In total, 6 international research groups with outstanding scientific background are involved in the analysis of samples retrieved from the ISS. Group leaders are:

Prof. Dr. Charles Cockell (Open University, UK)
Dr. Ruth Henneberger (ETH Zürich, CH)
Dr. Stefan Leuko (DLR Köln)
Dr. Petra Rettberg (DLR Köln)
Dr. Kasthuri Venkateswaran (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA)
Prof. Dr. Reinhard Wirth und Dr. Harald Huber (Uni Regensburg)

After the definition phase, the flight to the ISS and the sampling will be accomplished within the next years.

Project ARBEX

ISS (Fig. ESA)
ISS
(Fig.: © ESA)


Planetary Protection

What is Planetary Protection?

Planetary Protection is the discipline of protecting celestial bodies (also the Earth) from biological contamination during interplanetary missions.

Generally, there are two different kinds of interplanetary contamination:

Reverse contamination: The return of samples taken on other celestial bodies during a mission may cause a contamination of earth environments by unknown and foreign biological material (sample return).

Forward contamination: The contamination of extraterrestrial environments by terrestrial microorganisms or biomolecules. Importantly, future missions set out to seek for extraterrestrial life should not be compromised as contaminants may complicate or preclude the search for indigenous extraterrestrial life. Consequently, the major goal is to ensure the cleanliness (sterility) of spacecraft throughout assembly.

“States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter, and where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose.” (UN 1967)

Generally, space missions are classified into five categories:

Category 1: Missions to target bodies of no direct interest for understanding the process of chemical evolution or the origin of life (e.g. lander missions moon, flyby)
Category 2: Missions to bodies of interest, but with only a remote chance that contamination by a spacecraft could jeopardize future exploration (e.g. lander missions to comets, Venus, Saturn).
Category 3: Mission to bodies of significant interest and contamination risk (e.g. flyby, orbiter to Mars, Europa)
Category 4: Missions to bodies of significant  interest and contamination risk (e.g. landers on Mars, Europa)
Category 5: Any earth return missions

Depending on each category, the upper limit of biological burden has to be determined, considering the number of spores detectable on a spacecraft. This bioburden serves as a proxy indicator for the total microbial load.

Spacecraft is generally constructed in particle (and biologically) controlled clean rooms, keeping the microbial contamination as low as possible.

 

Planetrary Protection: Current Research

Preparation for ExoMars mission

Our group is characterizing clean rooms and spacecraft regarding bacterial and archaeal diversity. Therefore, samples are taken from diverse surfaces using swabs, wipes and other sampling devices. The samples are then subjected to different analyses:

Cultivable microorganisms are cultured under various conditions, isolated and then characterized (Stieglmeier et al., 2009). Scope of these investigations is to access and understand the present microbial community and to gain knowledge about skills and resistances of the habitants. Resistances to UV-irradiation, desiccation, vacuum and detergents are of major interest. As they appear as frequent contaminants, spore-forming microorganisms are again shown to have an advantage over others concerning these selective pressures.

As commonly accepted, only 1% of all known microorganisms are cultivable under defined laboratory conditions. Hence, sample analysis on DNA level is necessary to characterize the microbial community structure in clean rooms: After isolation of DNA, domain-specific (16S rRNA gene) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is carried out and bacterial and archaeal amplicons are further analyzed via cloning and sequencing. Moreover, we also investigate the abundance of microorganisms present per square meter clean room surface (using quantitative PCR).

Based on these results, sterilization procedures can be altered and adapted to ensure a low amount of contaminants.

Regarding the ExoMars mission, we are currently examining the clean rooms and testing our detections methods. For instance, sampling methods have been optimized and validated (Probst et al., 2010; Probst et al., 2011) and special cultivation attempts are employed.

This project is/was funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and EADS Astrium, Bremen.

ExoMars Rover

ExoMars Mission
(Fig.:
© ESA)


The ExoMars Rover will explore the surface of Mars from 2014. Provided with drilling- and exobiology equipment this rover will search for past or present life on Mars.
.
Encapsulated Bioburden

The analysis of possible contaminants on surfaces can be easily investigated: Using the wipe-rinse-technique microorganisms can be sampled from different materials and the attached microbial diversity can be analyzed. But, how heavily are the materials themselves loaded with microorganisms? How many unintentional contaminants are present in coatings, adhesives and other spacecraft related polymers?

Experiments for studying the survival capability of microorganisms in these polymers are based on embedding models. Different compounds are supplemented with bacterial spores throughout the processing and curing of the materials. Afterwards, molecular techniques as well as cultivation allow probability estimations for the survival of microorganisms after being encapsulated in spacecraft materials. Results will contribute to the assessment of the microbial burden of actual spacecraft and their materials.

This project is funded by Compliance- Advice and Services in Microbiology GmbH, Cologne and the European Space Agency (ESA).

B. safensis Sporen

CLSM image of B. safensis spores
treated with PMA.
Bars: 5 µm.

A: Regular spores after staining.
B: Heat-inactivated spores.


Planetary Protection: Previous projects

Herschel

From Friedrichshafen (Germany) to Noordwijk (The Netherlands) and Kourou (French Guiana) and then to outer space… The housing facilities of the Herschel Space Observatory were spread all over the world. Throughout this period (from 2007 to 2009) the spacecraft was exposed to clean rooms of different geographic locations (from maritime to extremely humid). Our work group joined Herschel on its journey in order to analyze the microbial community associated with the spacecraft and the surrounding clean room environments.

Besides a broad but specialized bacterial diversity (Stieglmeier et al., 2009; Behrendt et al., 2010), we were able to retrieve genetic signatures and positive FISH samples of Archaea from clean rooms. These were shown to cluster within the Thaumarchaeota and are supposed to play a special role in clean room environments (Moissl-Eichinger, 2011).

This project was funded by the European Space Agency (ESA).

Herschel-Teleskop
Herschel.
(Fig.: © ESA

Team member:

Staff :
Alexandra Perras Max Mora Anna Auerbach

Maximilan Mora
Alexandra Perras
Anna Auerbach

Previous members of staff:
Alex Probst Sandra Meck Michaela Stieglmeier Petra Schwendner Alexander Mahnert

Alexander Probst, UC Berkeley, Earth and Planetary Sciences
Sandra Meck
, Hyperthermics Regensburg GmbH
Michaela Stieglmeier
, Universität Wien, Dep. für Ökogenetik
Petra Schwendner, DLR Köln/ Universität Regensburg

Alexander Mahnert, TU Graz, Institut für Umweltbiologie

September 2013 Alex Probst Christian Fink Max Mora Alex Perras Marion Sandra Meck Anna Auerbach Christine Moissl-Eichinger September 2013

 


Publications :

2014
Berg G, Mahnert A and Moissl-Eichinger C (2014): „Beneficial effects of plant-associated microbes on indoor microbiomes and human health?”. Frontiers in Microbiology: Plant-Microbe Interaction, doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00015.

Bauermeister A, Mahnert A, Auerbach A, Böker A, Flier N, Weber C, Probst AJ, Moissl-Eichinger C, and Haberer K (2014): Quantification of encapsulated bioburden in spacecraft polymer materials by cultivation-dependent and molecular methods. PLoS One 9(4), e94265. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094265.

Probst A J, Birarda G, Holman H-Y N, DeSantis, T Z, Wanner G, Andersen GL, Perras AK, Meck S, Völkel J, Bechtel H A, Wirth R, and Moissl-Eichinger C (2014): „ Coupling genetic and chemical microbiome profiling reveals heterogeneity of archaeome and bacteriome in subsurface biofilms that are dominated by the same archaeal species”. PLOS ONE (in press)

2013
Moissl-Eichinger C, Pukall P, Probst AJ, Stieglmeier M, Schwendner P, Mora M, Barczyk S, Bohmeier M, and Rettberg P (2013): “Lessons learned from the microbial analysis of the Herschel spacecraft during assembly, integration and testing operations”. Astrobiology 13(12): 1125-1139.

Schwendner P, Moissl-Eichinger C, Barczyk S, Bohmeier M, Pukall P, and Rettberg P (2013): “Insights into the microbial diversity and bioburden in a South-American spacecraft assembly clean room”. Astrobiology 13(12):1140-1154.

Morris B, Henneberger R, Huber H, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013):“ Microbial syntrophy: interaction for the common good“. FEMS Microbiology Reviews, 37: 384-406. doi: 10.1111/1574-6976.12019

Probst AJ, Auerbach AK, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): “Archaea on Human Skin”. PLoS ONE 8(6): e65388. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065388.

Probst AJ, Holman HY, Desantis TZ, Andersen GL, Birarda G, Bechtel HA, Piceno YM, Sonnleitner M, Venkateswaran K, Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Tackling the minority: sulfate-reducing bacteria in an archaea-dominated subsurface biofilm” ISME J, 7(3): 635-651. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2012.133

2012
Vaishampayan P, Moissl-Eichinger C, Pukall R, Schumann P, Spröer C, Augustus A, Roberts AH, Namba G, Cisneros J, Salmassi T, Venkateswaran K (2012): “Description of Tersicoccus phoenicis gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from spacecraft assembly clean room environments”. IJSEM, accepted.

Probst AJ, Holman HY, Desantis TZ, Andersen GL, Birarda G, Bechtel HA, Piceno YM, Sonnleitner M, Venkateswaran K, Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Tackling the minority: sulfate-reducing bacteria in an archaea-dominated subsurface biofilm” ISME J, in press. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2012.133

Moissl‑Eichinger C, Rettberg P and Pukall R (2012): "The first collection of spacecraft‑associated microorganisms: a public source for extremotolerant microorganisms from spacecraft assembly clean rooms". Astrobiology 12(11):1024-34. doi: 10.1089/ast.2012.0906.

Vaishampayan P*, Probst AJ*, La Duc MT*, Bargoma E, Bernadini JN, Andersen GL, and Venkateswaran K (2012): “New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments”, ISME J, Epub ahead of print. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2012.114. *authors contributed equally

Stieglmeier M, Rettberg P, Barczyk S, Bohmeier M, Pukall R, Wirth R, and Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Abundance, distribution and diversity of microbial inhabitants in European spacecraft-associated clean rooms”, Astrobiology (12): 572-585.

Moissl-Eichinger C, and Huber H (2012): “Archaeelle Symbionten und Parasiten“, Biospektrum (03/2012): 244-247.

McDonald D, Price MN, Goodrich J, Nawrocki EP, DeSantis TZ, Probst A, Andersen GL, Knight R, and Hugenholtz P (2011): “An improved Greengenes taxonomy with explicit ranks for ecological and evolutionary analyses of bacteria and archaea”, ISME J (6): 610- 618.

Moissl-Eichinger C, Henneberger R, and Huber R (2012): “SM1: a cold-loving archaeon with powerful nano grappling hooks“, In: Extremophiles: Microbiology and Biotechnology (Editor: Anitori, R. P.), Horizon Press.

Probst A, Mahnert A, Weber C, Haberer K, and Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): ”Detecting inactivated endospores in fluorescence microscopy using propidium monoazide”, Int J Astrobiol (11): 117-123.

Weiner A, Schopf S, Wanner G, Probst A, and Wirth R (2012): ”Positive, neutral and negative interactions in cocultures between Pyrococcus furiosus and different methanogenic Archaea”, Microbiol Insights (4): 1-10.

2011
Moissl-Eichinger C. (2011): “Extremophiles in spacecraft assembly clean rooms”, In: Adaption of microbial life to environmental extremes: research and application (Editors: Stan-Lotter, H. and S. Fendrihan), Springer.
 
Cooper M, La Duc MT, Probst A, Vaishampayan P, Stam C, Benardini JN, Piceno YM, Andersen GL, and Venkateswaran K (2011): “Comparison of Innovative Molecular Approaches and Standard Spore Assays for Assessment of Surface Cleanliness”, Appl Environ Microbiol (77): 5438-5444.

Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C, Wanner G, Zweck J, Huber H, Thomm M, and Rachel R (2011): “The S-layer of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain SP5/1 and a new, pyrite-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus isolate HV2/2”, Arch Microbiol (193): 867-882.

Kwan K, Cooper M, LaDuc MT, Vaishampayan P, Stam C, Benardini JN, Scalzi G, Moissl-Eichinger C, and Venkateswaran K (2011): “Evaluation of Procedures for the collection, processing, and analysis of biomolecules from low-biomass surfaces”, Appl Env Microbiol (77): 2943-2953.

Moissl-Eichinger C and Huber H (2011): “Archaeal symbionts and parasites”, Curr Opin Microbiol (14): 364-370.

Wirth R, Bellack A, Bertl M, Bilek Y, Heimerl T, Herzog B, Leisner M, Probst A, Rachel R, Sarbu C, Schopf S and Wanner G (2011): “The mode of cell wall growth in selected archaea is similar to the general mode of cell wall growth in bacteria as revealed by fluorescent dye analysis”, Appl Environ Microbiol (77): 1556-1562.

Probst A, Facius R, Wirth R, Wolf M and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Recovery of Bacillus spore contaminants from rough surfaces: A challenge to space mission cleanliness control”, Appl Environ Microbiol (77): 1628-1637.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Archaea in artificial environments: Their presence in spacecraft clean rooms and impact on Planetary Protection”, ISME J (5): 209-219.

2010
Behrendt U, Schumann P, Stieglmeier M, Pukall R, Augustin J, Schwendner P, Moissl-Eichinger C, Spröer C and Ulrich A (2010): “Characterization of heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria with respiratory ammonification and denitrification activity – Description of Paenibacillus uliginis sp. nov., an inhabitant of fen peat soil and Paenibacillus purispatii sp. nov., isolated from a spacecraft assembly clean room”, Syst Appl Microbiol (33): 328-336.

Hazen TC, Dubinsky EA, DeSantis TZ, Andersen GL, Piceno YM, Singh N, Jansson JR, Probst A, Borglin SE, Fortney JL, Stringfellow WT, Bill M, Conrad MS, Tom LM, Chavarria KL, Alusi TR, Lamendella R, Joyner DC, Spier C, Baelum J, Auer M, Zemla ML, Chakraborty R, Sonnenthal EL, D'haeseleer P, Holman, H-Y N, Osman S, Lu Z, Van Nostrand J, Deng Y, Zhou J and Mason OU (2010): “Deep-Sea Oil Plume Enriches Indigenous Oil-Degrading Bacteria”Science (330): 204-208.

Probst A, Facius R, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Validation of a Nylon-Flocked-Swab Protocol for Efficient Recovery of Bacterial Spores from Smooth and Rough Surfaces”, Appl Environ Microbiol (76): 5148-5158.

Vaishampayan P, Probst A, Krishnamurthi S, Ghosh S, Osman S, McDowall A, Ruckmani A, Mayilraj S and Venkateswaran K (2010): “Bacillus horneckiae sp. nov., isolated from a spacecraft assembly clean room”Int J Syst Evol Microbiol (60): 1031-1037.

Probst A, Vaishampayan P, Osman S, Moissl-Eichinger C, Andersen GL and Venkateswaran K (2010): “Diversity of Anaerobic Microbes in Spacecraft Assembly Clean Rooms”, Appl Environ Microbiol (76): 2837-2845.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Original Articles Versus Press Reports”, Comment in: ASM Microbe.

2009
Lowin T, Straub RH, Neumann E, Bosserhoff A, Vogel C, Moissl C, Anders S, Mueller-Ladner U and Schedel J (2009): “Glucocorticoids increase alpha5 integrin expression and adhesion of synovial fibroblasts but inhibit ERK signaling, migration, and cartilage invasion, Arthritis & Rheumatism (60): 3623-3632.

Stieglmeier M, Wirth R, Kminek G and Moissl-Eichinger C (2009): “Cultivation of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic Bacteria from spacecraft-associated clean rooms”, Appl Env Microbiol (75): 3484-3491.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2009): “Planetary Protection: Per Anhalter durch das Universum.“, Lab&more (03/09): 40-41.

2008
Antunes A, Taborda M, Huber R, Moissl C, Fernanda Nobre M and da Costa MS (2008): “Halorhabdus tiamatea sp. nov., a non-pigmented, extremely halophilic archaeon from a deep-sea, hypersaline anoxic basin of the Red Sea, and emended description of the genus halorhabdus”, Int J Syst Evol Microbiol (58): 215-20.

Moissl C, Bruckner JC and Venkateswaran K (2008): “Archaeal diversity analysis of spacecraft assembly clean rooms”, ISME J (2): 115-119.

2007
Osman S, Moissl C, Hosoya N, Briegel A, Mayilraj S, Satomi M and Venkateswaran K (2007): “Tetrasphaera remsis sp. nov., isolated from the Regenerative Enclosed Life Support Module Simulator (REMS) air system”, Int J Syst Evol Microbiol (57): 2749-2753.

Moissl C, La Duc MT, Osman S, Dekas AE and Venkateswaran K (2007): “Geographical variations of molecular microbial communities associated with spacecraft assembly clean rooms”, FEMS Microbiol Ecol (61):  509-521.

Moissl C, Hosoya N, Bruckner J, Stuecker T, Roman M and Venkateswaran K (2007): “Molecular microbial community structure of the Regenerative Enclosed Life Support Module Simulator air system”, Int J Astrobiol (6): 131-145.

La Duc MT, Dekas A, Osman S, Moissl C, Newcombe D and Venkateswaran K (2007): “Isolation and characterization of bacteria capable of tolerating the extreme conditions of clean room environments”, Appl Env Microbiol (73): 2066-2011.

2006
Henneberger R, Moissl C, Amann T, Rudolph C and Huber R (2006): “New insights in the lifestyle of the cold-loving SM1 euryarchaeon: natural growth as a "monospecies" biofilm in the subsurface“, Appl Env Microbiol (72): 192-199.

Koch M, Rudolph C, Moissl C and Huber R (2006): “A cold-loving crenarchaeon is substantial part of a novel microbial community in cold sulfidic marsh water”, FEMS Microbiol Ecol (57): 56-66.

2005
Moissl C, Rachel R, Briegel A, Engelhardt H and Huber R (2005): “The unique structure of archaeal „hami“, highly complex cell appendages with nano- grappling hooks“, Mol Microbiol (56): 361-370.

Moissl C, Briegel A, Engelhardt H and Huber R (2005): “Enterhaken und Stacheldraht: Verblüffende Strukturen aus der archaeellen Nano-Welt“, BIOspektrum (06/05): 732-733.

2004
Moissl C (2004): “Molekularbiologische und strukturelle Untersuchungen zur Biologie des neuartigen, kälteliebenden SM1 Euryarchaeons und seiner  verschiedenen Lebensgemeinschaften”. Dissertation, Universität Regensburg.

Rudolph C, Moissl C, Henneberger R and Huber R (2004): “Ecology and microbial structures of archaeal/bacterial strings-of-pearls communities and archaeal relatives thriving in cold sulfidic springs“, FEMS Microbiol Ecol (50): 1-11.

2003
Moissl C, Rudolph C, Rachel R, Koch M and Huber R (2003): “In situ growth of the novel SM1 euryarchaeon from a string-of-pearls-like microbial community in its cold biotope, its physical separation and insights into its structure and physiology“, Arch Microbiol (180): 211-217.

2002
Moissl C, Rudolph C and Huber R (2002): “Natural communities of novel archaea and bacteria with a string-of-pearls-like morphology: Molecular analysis of the bacterial partners“, Appl Env Microbiol (68): 933-937.


Poster:

2013
Moissl-Eichinger C, Probst AJ, Auerbach AK (2013): "Archaea on human skin". GRC Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology. Lucca (Barga), Italy.

Probst AJ, Weinmaier T, Rattei T, Birarda G, Holman H-Y N, DeSantis TZ, Andersen GL, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "Phylogenetics, infrared imaging and metagenomics of a natural archaeal biofilm". GRC Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology. Lucca (Barga), Italy.

Stieglmeier M, Mooshammer M, Shen T, Kitzler B, Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C, Bauer C, Richter A, Zechmeister-Boltenstern S, Schleper S (2013): "What does a wonder look like? - Morphology and N-metabolism of the thaumarchaeota Nitrososphaera viennensis". GRC conference Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology. Lucca (Barga), Italy. (1st Posterprice)

Meck S, Probst AJ, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "Archaea in terrestrial freshwater springs". VAAM meeting, Bremen, Germany

Perras A, Wanner G, Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "The uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon - uncovering its ultrastructure". VAAM meeting, Bremen, Germany.

Probst AJ, Weinmaier T, Rattei T, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "The uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon - uncovering its genetic potential". VAAM meeting, Bremen, Germany.

Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C, Huber H, Wanner G, Rachel R (2013): "Stripe-like surface layer proteins of Acidithiobacillus – an electron microscopical survey”. 20th International Biohydrometallurgy Symposium 2013, Antofagasta, Chile.

2012
Mahnert A, Oberauner L, Högenauer C, Smolle K-H, Probst AJ, Moissl-Eichinger C, Berg G (2012): “Microbial communities of two different extreme indoor environments”. 4th American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Conference on Beneficial Microbes in San Antonio, TX, USA

Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C, Thomm M, Huber H, Wanner G, Zweck J, Rachel R (2012): "The proof of S-layer proteins with p2-Symmetry in Acidithiobacillus – an electron microscopical survey". European Microscopy Conference 2012, Manchester, UK.

Probst AJ, Rattei T and Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Metagenomic Analysis of an Archaea-dominated Subsurface Biofilm”, International Society for Microbial Ecology, 14th meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark

Moissl-Eichinger C and Probst AJ (2012): “The uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon – uncovering its mysteryInternational Society for Microbial Ecology, 14th meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark

Moissl-Eichinger C and Probst AJ (2012): “The uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon – uncovering its mystery”, Molecular Biology of Archaea 3, Marburg, Germany

Stieglmeier M, Mooshammer M, Kitzler B, Moissl-Eichinger C, Zechmeister-Boltenstern S, Richter A, Schleper C (2012): “Insights into the physiology of the ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrososphaera viennensis”, Molecular Biology of Archaea 3, Marburg, Germany

Probst AJ, Vaishampayan P, Tom L, Krebs J, Andersen GL and Venkateswaran K (2012): ”PhyloChip G3 Analysis of Novel Icelandic Hot Springs reveals Archaea being Biotic Indicators for changes in PH and Temperature”, American Society for Microbiology, 111th general meeting, San Francisco, US

Vaishampayan P, Probst AJ, La Duc MT, Bargoma E, Benardini JN, Andersen GL and Venkateswaran K (2012): “Viability Assessment of Microbial Communities using State-of-the-Art Molecular Techniques”, American Society for Microbiology, 111th general meeting, San Francisco, US

Probst AJ, Holman H-Y N, DeSantis TZ, Piceno Y, Andersen GL, Bechtel HA, Sonnleitner M, Venkateswaran K and Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Natural Transition from One Lifestyle to Another: A Cold-Loving Archaeon switches from Dominating an Ecosystem to Symbiosis with Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria”, American Society for Microbiology, 111th general meeting, San Francisco, US 

2011
Takahashi LK, Probst AJ, Leone SR, Ahmed M and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Mass Spectrometry of Lipid Biomarkers in the SM1 Euryarchaeon Biofilm”, Gordon Research Conference, Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology, Waterville Valley, US

Mahnert AProbst A, Weber C, Wirth R, Haberer K and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): ”Detection, Physiological Analysis and Quantification of Spores encapuslated in modern spacecraft hardware materials”, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Probst A, Mahnert A and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Propidium Monoazide – A Marker for Non-viable Bacterial Endospores in Fluorescence Microscopy”, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Auerbach A, Schwendner P, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Are paenibacilli relevant for planetary protection?” – 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Probst A, Holman H-Y N, DeSantis T, Andersen GL, Venkateswaran K and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): ”Microbial Diversity and Biochemistry of the SM1-Euryarchaeon biofilm”, 4th meeting of the Federation of European Microbiological Society, Geneva, Switzerland

Augustus A, Roberts A, Vaishampayan PA, Schwendner P, Moissl-Eichinger C, Salmassi T and Venkateswaran K (2011): “Description of Arthrobacter phoenicissp. nov., Isolated from the Phoenix Lander Assembly Facility”, American Society for Microbiology, 110th general meeting, New Orleans, US

Schwendner P, Moissl-Eichinger C, Wirth R and Rettberg P (2011): “Contaminants from closed environments – Paenibacilli in spacecraft associated clean rooms”, DLR envihab Symposium 2011 Cologne, Germany, 3. POSTER AWARD

Cooper M, LaDuc M, Probst A, Vaishampayan P, Stam C, Bernadini J, Piceno Y, Andersen GL and Venkateswaran K (2011): “Comparative Analyses of Molecular Approaches and a NASA Standard Spore Assay in Assessing the Cleanliness of Spacecraft Surfaces”, American Society for Microbiology, 110th general meeting, New Orleans, US

De Santis TZ, Singh N, Andersen G, Werner J, Koren O, Ley R, McDonald D, Knight R, Probst A, Kelly S, Venkateswaran K, White O, Pei Z and Hugenholtz P (2011): “Greengenes 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Database Update For 2011”, International Human Microbiome Congress, Vancouver, CA

2010
Dubinsky EA, DeSantis TZ, Piceno YM, Mason OU, Singh NNS, Probst A, Joyner DC, Chakraborty R, Hazen TC and Andersen GL (2010): “Phylochip Assay finds Deepwater Oil Plume Enrichment of Psychrophilic Oil-Degrading Bacteria”, International Society for Microbial Ecology, 13th meeting, Seattle, US

Mason OU, Probst A, Dubinsky EA, Piceno YM, Tom LM, Fortney J,  Lamendella R, Hazen TC and Jansson JK (2010): “Microbial diversity of a dispersed deep-sea oil plume. International Society for Microbial Ecology”, International Society for Microbial Ecology, 13th meeting, Seattle, US

Schwendner P, Stieglmeier M, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Spore-forming Paenibacillus isolates and the relationship to Planetary Protection”, 38th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Bremen, Germany

Probst A, Facius R, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Rough Spacecraft Surfaces – A Threat to Planetary Protection Issues”, 38th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Bremen, Germany

Moissl-Eichinger C and Probst A (2010): “Validation of the nylon flocked swab for planetary protection applications”, 38th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Bremen, Germany

Schwendner P, Vaishampayan P, Osman S, Rabbow E, Moissl-Eichinger C, Horneck G and Venkateswaran K (2010): “Viability of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores after exposing to space and simulated Mars conditions using EXPOSE EuTEF module”, American Society for Microbiology, 110th general meeting, San Diego, US

Bellack A, Loose JProbst A, Rachel R, Wanner G and Wirth R. (2010): “A closer investigation of flagella and membrane proteins of Pyrococcus furiosus”, 3rd corporate meeting of VAAM and DGHM, Hannover, Germany

2009
Probst A, Wolf M, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2009): “Detection, Sampling and Analysis of Spores on Rough Surfaces in Terms of Planetary Protection”, 9th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Brussels, Belgium. POSTER AWARD

Schwendner P, Stieglmeier M, Wirth R and Moissl-Eichinger C (2009): “Microbial Analysis of the Herschel Mission - Impact on Planetary Protection”, 9th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Brussels, Belgium

Probst A, Vaishampayan P, Moissl-Eichinger C and Venkateswaran K (2009): “Microbial Diversity of Anaerobes from Spacecraft Associated Surfaces”, American Society for Microbiology, 109th general meeting, Philadelphia, US

2008
Gosh S, Vaishampayan P, Osman S, Probst A and Venkateswaran K (2008): “Extremophilic Microbes from the Phoenix Spacecraft Associated Environments”, Postdoc Research Day at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, US

Moissl-Eichinger C, Venkateswaran K and Kminek G (2008): “New insights into the microbial diversity in spacecraft assembly clean rooms and the impact on Planetary Protection“, Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie e.V. (VAAM), Jahrestagung 2008, Frankfurt, Germany

2007
Moissl C, LaDuc MT, Osman S, Dekas AE and Venkateswaran K (2006): “Geographical Variations of Molecular Microbial Communities Associated with Spacecraft Assembly Clean Rooms”, American Society for Microbiology, 106th general meeting, Orlando, FL, US

2005
Moissl C, Briegel A, Rachel R, Engelhardt H and Huber R (2005): “Grappling hooks and barbwires: amazing insights into the archaeal nano-world. Archaea- the first generation”, Meeting at Schloss Hohenkammer, Munich, Germany, POSTER AWARD

2004
Moissl C, Rachel R, Briegel A, Engelhardt H and Huber R (2004): “Nano- grappling hooks and nano- forks: a unique archaeal cell surface appendage („hamus”)”, Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie e.V. (VAAM), Jahrestagung 2004, Braunschweig, Germany

2003
Moissl C, Rachel R, Rudolph C and Huber R (2003): “Grappling hooks and forks: A novel archaeal surface structure” Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie e.V. (VAAM), Jahrestagung 2003, Berlin, Germany

2002
Moissl C, Rudolph C and Huber R (2002): “Natural communities of Archaea and Bacteria growing in cold sulfurous springs with a strings-of-pearls morphology”, Extremophiles, Naples, Italy

2001
Moissl C, Rudolph C and Huber R (2001): “A newly discovered bacterial/ archaeal association (“string of pearls”): Molecular analysis of the bacterial part”, Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie e.V. (VAAM), Jahrestagung 2001, Göttingen, Germany


Talks:

2013
Probst AJ, Auerbach AK, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "Archaea on human skin". GRC Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology. Lucca (Barga), Italy.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "New insights into the ecology, metabolism, metagenome and ultrastructure... of the uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon". Universität Wien, Austria.

Probst AJ (2013):"The uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon: Bio(chemical) Diversity and Metagenomics". Universität Wien, Austria

Mahnert A, Vaishampayan P, Auerbach A,  Probst AJ, Moissl-Eichinger C, Venkateswaran K, Berg G (2013): “Viable Microbiome of a Spacecraft Assembly Clean Room – a genetic approach”.  How dead is dead III: Life cycles conference of the Association for General and Applied Microbiology – (VAAM), Berlin, Germany

Mahnert A, Auerbach A,  Probst AJ, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): “Monitoring the Physiological Status of Polymer-embedded Bacillus safensis Spores by Fluorescent Dye Staining”. How dead is dead III: Life cycles conference of the Association for General and Applied Microbiology – (VAAM), Berlin, Germany

Probst AJ, Auerbach AK, Moissl-Eichinger C (2013): "Thaumarchaeota on human skin - implications for medical surveys?" VAAM meeting, Bremen, Germany

Klingl A, Henneberger R, Moissl-Eichinger C, Huber H, Rachel R (2013): "S-layer proteins in pyrite-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea – Structure, function and its limited application as taxonomic marker". VAAM meeting, Bremen, Germany

2012
Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Molecular strategies for the determination of abundance and physiological status of microbial cells and spores encapsulated in spacecraft polymers”, Rapid Microbiological Methods Conference, Munich.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “The mysterious and fascinating world of uncultivated Archaea”, Lehrveranstaltung Umweltmikrobiologie, TU Graz, Austria.

Moissl-Eichinger C (2012): “Microbiology in clean rooms and planetary protection”, International Society for Microbial Ecology, 14th meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark

Moissl-Eichinger C, Rettberg P, Pukall R (2012): ”The first collection of spacecraft-associated microorganisms: a public source for extremotolerant microorganisms”, 39th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Mysore, India

2011
Probst A, Cooper M, Venkateswaran K, Andersen GL and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Methods in Planetary Protection – A Thightrobe Walk”, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Klingl A, Moissl-Eichinger C, Zweck J, Wanner G, Thomm M, Huber H, Rachel R (2011): "The S-layer protein of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans SP5/1 and its involvement in pyrite oxidation". Microscopy Conference 2011, Kiel, Germany

Weber C, Mahnert AProbst A, Wirth R, Moissl-Eichinger C and Haberer K (2011): “The role of microbial survival in polymers / polymeric adhesives for space flight hardware-implications for Planetary Protection”, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Moissl-Eichinger C, Rettberg P, Pukall R (2011): “The first collection of spacecraft-associated microorganisms: a public source for extremotolerant microorganisms from spacecraft assembly clean rooms“, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Cologne, Germany

Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Planetary Protection:  Mikronauten als blinde Passagiere”, Sommerfest der Universität Regensburg

Probst A, Holman H-Y N, DeSantis T, Andersen G, Venkateswaran K and Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): ”Microbial Diversity and Biochemistry of the SM1-Euryarchaeon biofilm”, 4th meeting of the Federation of European Microbiological Society, Geneva, Switzerland

Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Neuartige Lebensgemeinschaften mit unbekannten Eigenschaften: Kälteliebende Archaeen im Sippenauer Moor“, Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU)- Schüleraustausch, Regensburg

Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “(Un)usual Archaea in special environments: enigmatic, hidden and uncultivated“. University of Vienna, Austria

Moissl-Eichinger C (2011): “Planetary Protection: Microbial hitchhikers to the universe”. TU Graz, Austria

2010
Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Insights into the fascinating world of uncultivated Archaea”, University of Hamburg, Germany

Probst A and Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Sampling rough surfaces in Terms of Planetary Protection”, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group (invited talk)

Schwendner P, Vaishampayan P, Miller D, Rabbow E, Moissl-Eichinger C, Rettberg P, Horneck G and Venkateswaran K (2010): “Bacillus pumilus spores hitchhiking to ISS - Survivability after exposure to space and simulated Mars conditions“, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Pushchino, Russia

Schwendner P, Stieglmeier M, Moissl-Eichinger C (2010): “Paenibacillus- a typical clean room contaminant posing a threat to Planetary Protection?”, 11th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Pushchino, Russia

Moissl-Eichinger C, Stieglmeier M, Schwendner P. and KminekG (2010): “Microbial diversity in European and South American spacecraft assembly clean rooms”, 38th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Bremen, Deutschland

2009
Moissl-Eichinger C
(2009): “Anaerobes and other microbial specialists in spacecraft associated environments”, 9th meeting of the European Astrobiology Network Association, Brussels, Belgium

Stieglmeier M and Moissl-Eichinger C (2009): “New insights into the microbial diversity in spacecraft assembly clean rooms and the impact on Planetary Protection“, Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie e.V. (VAAM), Bochum, Germany

2008
Moissl-Eichinger C (2008): “Microbial diversity in spacecraft associated clean rooms”, 37th COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) meeting, Montreal, Canada

2007
Moissl C, Venkateswaran K and Kminek G (2007): “New insights into the microbial diversity in spacecraft assembly clean rooms and the impact on planetary protection”, 7th European Workshop on Astrobiology, European Astrobiology Network Association, Turku, Finland

Moissl C (2007): “Vom Sumpf in den Weltall- das weite Feld der ökologischen Mikrobiologie“ Perspektiven für Studienanfänger, Veranstaltung zur Semestereinführung der biologischen Fakultät, Universität Regensburg, Germany

2006
Moissl C (2006): “String of pearls and grappling hooks: Insights into the fascinating world of uncultivated Archaea”Symposium: Frontiers in microbiology, Marburg

Huber R, Moissl C, Rudolph C, Henneberger R, Amann T and Koch M (2006): “Natural communities of novel Archaea and Bacteria in the cold”, 11th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology, Vienna, Austria

Huber R and Moissl C (2006): “Archaea, archaea everywhere”, Invited talk, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, US

Huber R and Moissl C (2006): “Archaea, archaea everywhere”, Invited talk, Caltech, Pasadena, US

Moissl C (2006): “Von Perlenketten und Enterhaken: Verblüffende Einblicke in die Welt der unkultivierten Archaea“,  Tag der Biowissenschaften, Universität Regensburg, Germany